Barbara Grossman-Thompson

Barbara Grossman-Thompson

Office – Liberal Arts 3 – 103B
EmailBarbara.Grossman-Thompson@csulb.edu

Barbara Grossman-ThompsonDr. Barbara Grossman-Thompson is a Southern California native, originally from San Diego, CA. She attended San Diego State University for her BA and MA in Women’s Studies. She began her PhD in sociology at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2009. As a comparative sociologist with a particular interest in the political economy of contemporary South Asia, her main areas of inquiry include the gendered organization of labor in South Asia and the implications of development in the Himalayan region, with an emphasis on Nepal. Her dissertation research focuses on the gendered implications of social change and economic development in Nepal and asks, how do Nepali women articulate and understand their identities as female wage-laborers in the con-text of globalization? In particular, her dissertation considers the way in which her informants navigate conflicting dis-courses about women’s role in the public and private sphere as “public women.” Her secondary research interest concerns the political economy of migration and diaspora. The growing number of Nepali women migrating abroad for work poses numerous questions about the gendered nature of migration, migration policy and remittances. Dr. Grossman-Thompson’s current research projects focus on migration as a process shaped by both local and global forces as well as historically dominant and emergent ways of thinking about gender and mobility.

As an instructor Dr. Grossman-Thompson’s goal is to encourage students to think critically and work through concepts rather than accepting the material She presents as “the” answer. To this end her teaching philosophy has two main tenets. First, she teaches using a student-centered approach that strives to make subject matter relatable to the daily life of the student. Second, she engages experiential education techniques whenever possible in order to promote active learning. From 2004-2009 Dr. Grossman-Thompson led multiweek backpacking courses for teenagers in wilderness areas. Transferring the experience she gained as an experiential educator to the classroom, Dr. Grossman-Thompson approaches learning as a process of co-creating knowledge that requires active participation from student and teacher alike.

Dr. Grossman-Thompson is excited to be joining the CSULB faculty and will be arriving in Long Beach with her two dogs Nari and Tika, who are originally from Nepal but are very excited to be in the U.S.